CEP: December 2015

This SBE supplement covers the development of continuous processing techniques in upstream and downstream biopharmaceutical processes. It also details factors that are impeding end-to-end implementation of continuous biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes, and points out that despite some misconceptions, regulators such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), encourage, rather than prevent, continuous processing. Other topics in this issue include cyclic ditillation and France's chemical industry.

Editorial

A Vote for Science and Engineering

Even though the election of a new U.S. President is almost a year away, it’s hard to ignore the news media’s extensive coverage of the many candidates — their debates, their campaign speeches, their experience; almost anything they do or say is fair game for the press. However, science and engineering, for the most part, have gotten less attention than issues such as the economy, immigration, health care, homeland security, and gun control. 

Read more

Revive Your Columns with Cyclic Distillation

December
2015
Reactions and Separations
Costin Sorin Bîldea, Anton A. Kiss
This process intensification technique involves changing a tower’s internals and operating mode and the separate movement of the liquid and vapor phases. This can significantly increase column throughput and reduce energy requirements, while improving separation performance.

France’s Chemicals Industry is Rooted in Tradition

December
2015
Global Outlook
Didier Le Vély
France played a central role in the chemistry revolution and now has a leading role in the modern chemicals industry. Manufacturing a wide range of chemicals, from basics and specialties to fine chemicals for pharmaceuticals, the industry is a major contributor to France’s economy.

SBE Special Section: Biopharmaceuticals - SBE Update: Continuous Progress in Biopharmaceuticals

December
2015
SBE Special Section
Darlene Schuster
The goal of bioprocessing is to optimize natural or artificial biological systems by manipulating prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their environment to produce biopharmaceutical products. A bioprocess is divided into upstream and downstream operations. Upstream processing encompasses the steps from preliminary unmodified cell line culture to the mature modified cell culture and harvest; downstream processing includes the separation and purification of the biologics from the mature activated cell culture. These operations have typically been performed as batch processes.

SBE Special Section: Biopharmaceuticals - Continuous Processing in Upstream Operations

December
2015
SBE Special Section
Chun Chen, Chetan T. Goudar, Huong Le
Perfusion technology offers many benefits over fed-batch processing, such as reducing the size of the bioreactor, which reduces capital costs and enables the use of single-use bioreactor technology. Despite these advantages, a shift to continuous perfusion will likely be gradual.

SBE Special Section: Biopharmaceuticals - Continuous Processing in Downstream Operations

December
2015
SBE Special Section
Todd Przybycien, Professor Nigel Titchener-Hooker
The transition from batch to continuous downstream processing of biologics has been gradual, with some processes integrating continuous and batch operations. A fully continuous, commercial-scale downstream process has yet to be implemented. Find out why, as well as the current status of the technology.

SBE Special Section: Biopharmaceuticals (Full 19-Page Supplement)

December
2015
SBE Special Section
Chun Chen, Chetan T. Goudar, Huong Le, Todd Przybycien, Nigel Titchener-Hooker
SBE Update: Continuous Progress in Biopharmaceuticals; Continuous Processing in Upstream Operations; Continuous Processing in Downstream Operations; A Look at the Regulations
Copyright Permissions: 

Would you like to reuse content from CEP Magazine? It’s easy to request permission to reuse content. Simply click here to connect instantly to licensing services, where you can choose from a list of options regarding how you would like to reuse the desired content and complete the transaction.