Cynthia Mascone

Cynthia Mascone

Cindy Mascone is Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Engineering Progress, AIChE’s member magazine. She has more than 25 years of experience as a technical editor and writer, including four years as the head of her own freelance consulting business, Engineered Writing. Previously, she worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

She holds a BS in chemical engineering and engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon Univ., and has been an active member of AIChE and Society of Women Engineers.

ChEnected contributions

June 2018 CEP Preview

. by Cynthia Mascone

This month, CEP looks at the neural networks of deep learning and delves into Fourier transform infrared (FITR) spectroscopy, plus much more.

May 2018 CEP Preview

. by Cynthia Mascone

This month, brush up on the essentials of continuous evaporation, learn new uses for hydrofoil impellers, enjoy the special section on translational medicine, and more.

Elements of Fun

. by Cynthia Mascone

CEP editor in chief Cynthia Mascone takes a look at the periodic table, with plenty of trivia and fun. How well do you know the periodic table?

Turn Our Hindsight into Your Foresight

. by Cynthia Mascone

Getting your first job is just the start. Even with the best chemical engineering education under your belt, every job will present new challenges. Following is some great advice to help make the transition easier.

Whatever You Do, Don’t Look Down

. by Cynthia Mascone

Texting, calling, checking the time in a meeting—which is acceptable, and under what circumstances? See how your cell phone etiquette measures up against the average business person.

2/4   in the series Path to Sustainability

AIChE’s Path to Sustainability

. by Cynthia Mascone

AIChE is working towards sustainability on multiple fronts. It has formed the International Society for Water Solutions (ISWS) and the Association's Institute for Sustainability (IfS) has created the AIChE Sustainability Index, which companies can use to benchmark their sustainability performance. You'll also notice changes this year at the Annual Meeting, with the aim of a more sustainable gathering in Pittsburgh.

Happy Pi Day!

. by Cynthia Mascone

Today, mathematicians and number-lovers celebrate Pi Day — because the date can be written as 3.14; extreme enthusiasts take pi to five decimal places and mark Pi Minute at 1:59 (3.14159).

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