Modeling Non-Ideal Reactors and Mixers

This webinar is sponsored by COMSOL, Inc. and reflects their views, opinions, and recommendations. Attendance to this webinar is free.
Sponsored Webinar
Originally delivered May 7, 2014

This webinar discusses methods for defining and solving detailed models, calibrating simpler models to these detailed models, and simulating a process line using process flowsheet models. It also shows how COMSOL can be used for analyzing and solving such models.

Mathematical modeling and simulations of reactors and mixers can be done at different levels of detail for different purposes. The initial use of a model may be to run simulations in order to understand the process at hand. A fairly detailed model is then required in order to account for the main phenomena in a process. Such a model may also be used to predict, optimize, and control the reactor or mixer design and its operation.

When a device is simulated together with other equipment in a process line, simpler and less computationally demanding models may be included in a process flowsheet model. These simpler models can be calibrated to the detailed models in order to cover the operational range of the process. In turn, the process flowsheet models can be used to control and optimize the process line.

Typically, bench- and pilot-scale experiments of a process are performed before a full-scale unit is built. The mathematical models and the hypotheses behind them are validated using experimental results. The models can then be used to develop the process up to full scale in a safe and relatively inexpensive way. For existing processes, they can be used to control the operating conditions for purposes of improving the quality and reproducibility of the process.

Presenter(s): 

Ed Fontes

Ed Fontes is COMSOL’s chief technology officer. He has a PhD in electrochemical engineering from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.

Phil Kinnane

Phil Kinnane is a chemical engineer at COMSOL. He holds a BE in chemical engineering from the University of Sydney and a PhD in electrochemical engineering from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.

Would you like to access this content?

No problem. You just have to complete the following steps.

You have completed 0 of 2 steps.

  1. Log in

    You must be logged in to view this content. Log in now.

  2. Purchase Webinar

    You must purchase this webinar using one of the options below.
    If you already purchased this content recently, please click here to refresh the system's record of ownerships.

Pricing

List Price Free Free access
AIChE Members Free Free access
AIChE Undergraduate Student Members Free Free access
AIChE Graduate Student Members Free Free access
Sponsored webinars bring technical information from reputable firms and suppliers to AIChE members. The content reflects the views, opinions, and recommendations of the sponsoring organization. AIChE does not warrant or represent, expressly or by implication, the correctness or accuracy of the content of the information presented. As between (1) the AIChE, the presenter and author(s) of this work, their employers, and their employers' officers and directors, and (2) the user/viewer of this work, the user/viewer accepts any legal liability or responsibility whatsoever for the consequence of its use or misuse. Contact information for attendees of this webinar, including email address, will be shared with the sponsoring firm. You will always have the opportunity to unsubscribe from email from that organization.