Mixing Scale-Up: Small Mistakes Can Mean Big Success

Originally delivered Jul 14, 2010
  • Type:
    Archived Webinar
  • Level:
    Advanced
  • PDHs:
    1.00

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Mixing, especially for unusual processes or unique equipment, often requires development testing. Scale-up provides a means for doing small tests. The results of scale-up can be used to understand and design, or modify large-scale equipment. Exploring the unknown is an essential beginning to successful scale-up. The process dynamics and limitations need to be known before successful applications can be understood and applied.

Existing processes benefit from a better understanding gained through small-scale testing. The ability to try new ideas without disrupting production can provide opportunities to improve process results and increase profit potential. However, scale-down is not without its own challenges, as not everything behaves the same in a small-scale test. Therefore, identifying the critical factors is no less important.

Often understanding one small-scale mistake can be one of the best pieces of information for successful scale-up. Just do not make the same mistake again, especially in the large-scale process.

This Webinar provides insight into some essentials of mixing scale-up. You learn that how you conduct the tests can be as important as how you analyze the results. Each situation has unique characteristics, but proper scale-up methods can guide a successful development process. This Webinar is for anyone doing development work on processes involving fluid mixing.

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