Critical Water Issues for the Chemical Process Industries

Originally delivered Nov 17, 2010
  • Type:
    Archived Webinar
  • Level:
    Intermediate
  • PDHs:
    1.00

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By 2030, under an average economic growth scenario and without efficiency gains, global water requirements will grow from 4,500 billion cubic meters today to nearly 7,000 billion cubic meters – a 50 percent increase in just two decades. Analysts predict that by that time, available water supplies will satisfy only 60 percent of demand.

Access to sustainable water supplies is essential to chemical processing and the pharmaceuticals, technologies and fuel sources these processes enable. But increasing global competitiveness is driving chemical and processing industries to increase production, and consequently seek out both time-tested and new ways to use water that are both cost-effective and environmentally-friendlier. The bottom line is that today and into the foreseeable future, companies will be forced to consider strategies that conserve and reuse water more than ever before.

David Klanecky, global director of research and development for Dow Water & Process Solutions, provides an overview of the resins and water filtration technologies helping chemical process industries to make the most of the water we have today without risking the supplies of tomorrow.

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