Gas Separation Using Furanic-Based Polymer Membranes – Project H2 2020

Membrane gas separation is a financially significant and technologically critical component of the gas purification industry as it offers capital and operating cost advantages compared to other gas separation methods such as distillation, absorption, and adsorption. Many new polymer membrane materials have been proposed in recent years, but too often the cost of those materials and the inability to source commercial quantities prevent membrane manufacturers from developing new products.

Investigators

Mark Shiflett
Technical Fellow

Partner Organizations

University of Kansas

Focus Areas

Date approved

October 01, 2020
Current TRL
3

Caustic Aqueous Phase Electrochemical Reforming (CAPER) for Process Intensified Hydrogen Production

The goal of this project is to provide a near term technology solution for the distributed generation of renewable hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle applications. This project will investigate a novel Caustic Aqueous Phase Electrochemical Reforming (CAPER) process on an oxigenated hydrocarbon, liquid ethanol in this instance, to make strides towards the DOE’s long-term cost target of $4/kg of hydrogen at the dispenser.

Investigators

Su Ha
Professor / Director, O.H. Reaugh Laboratory for Oil and Gas Research

Focus Areas

Date approved

October 01, 2020
Current TRL
2

Microwave Catalysis for Process Intensified Modular Production of Value-Added Chemicals from Natural Gas

The rise in US natural gas supplied, tied to challenges/costs associated with natural gas logistics, point to the value of converting natural gas to liquid products. Indirect routes are generally energy inefficient and capital intensive. In contrast, direct non-oxidative natural gas conversion eliminates the syngas production step and required oxygen generation. However, these technologies have not been commercialized because of technical challenges such as low selectivity, coking, heat management, catalyst deactivation and catalyst regeneration.

Investigators

John Hu
Professor, Engineering

Focus Areas

Date approved

November 01, 2017
Current TRL
5

Advanced Nanocomposite Membrane for Natural Gas Purification

Processing natural gas is the largest industrial application of gas separation membranes. Membranes occupy 10% of the ~$5 billion worldwide annual market for new natural gas separation equipment, with amine absorption accounting for most of the rest. While widely used, amine systems suffer from corrosion, complex process design, and equipment often unsuitable for offshore gas processing platforms. Amine systems are also less efficient than membranes at high CO2 concentrations.

Investigators

Benny Freeman

Partner Organizations

University of Texas at Austin

Focus Areas

Date approved

November 01, 2017
Current TRL
4

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