RAPID MCPI - Energy Efficient Technology for Metals Separation

This project addresses the demonstration of a low-cost and low-energy pathway for the separation of metals from mixed scrap based on ionic liquids. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel electrochemical process for the separation of metals from mixed scrap using ionic liquids (ILs) at low temperatures.

Investigators

Ramana Reddy
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
3

Multiphase Microchannel Separator

In conventional two-phase separation, mass transport between the two phases can be intensified via increased surface area, usually in the form of smaller droplets or bubbles, resulting in higher energy cost due to agitation or mixing and slower processing time as the smaller droplet phase requires more time to separate. One can increase processing speed in centrifugal extractors but this, in turn, increases energy requirements significantly. Often, microscale process intensification is at odds with macroscale energy efficiency in conventional systems.

Investigators

Goran Jovanovic
Professor, Chemical Engineering

Partner Organizations

Oregon State University

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
4

Thermoneutral Propane Dehydrogenation via a Solid Oxide Membrane Reactor

This project is utilizing solid oxide membrane reactors for chemical transformations that are critical to the seamless integration of shale natural gas and liquids into the chemical industry supply chain. The project is particularly interested in the production of propylene from propane. Current propylene production occurs primarily via naphtha steam cracking, a highly energy intensive process that is not amenable to distributed operations, which are highly desirable when shale natural gas and liquid is used as the carbon source.

Investigators

Suljo Linic
Professor of Chemical Engineering

Partner Organizations

University of Michigan

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
3

Microfibrous Entrapped Sorbents for High Throughput Modular Process Intensified Gas Separation and Ion Exchange

This project will utilize microfibrous entrapment of small particulate sorbents or ion exchange (IX) resins to overcome physical barriers and identified technology gaps that currently prevent energy efficient and cost-effective wellhead CO2/CH4 separations through pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and Cs+ removal from nuclear fuel processing streams. Both commercial cyclic adsorption processes are currently limited by heat and mass transport restrictions occurring in large particle (1-4 mm diameter) packed beds.

Investigators

Paul Dimick
General Manager

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
3

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