Sugars-To-Bioproducts Scalable Platform Technology

While tremendous progress has been achieved on creating routes for production of chemicals and fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, many of these processes are not economic due to the number of process steps required and the requirement for significant inter-stage separations. This project is developing a modularized chemical process intensification technology for the production of bio-para-xylene (biopX) from glucose.

Investigators

Basudeb Saha
Associate Director, Research

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
4

Robust Membranes For Black Liquor Concentration

Black liquor (BL), also known as “spent pulping liquor”, is a high-volume byproduct of lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment (i.e., wood pulping by the kraft process). BL is a corrosive, toxic, and complex mixture. About 500 million tons/yr of BL are produced in more than 200 kraft process units worldwide (including 99 in the US, with about 0.2 quads/yr energy spent for BL concentration by multi-effect evaporation). Currently, BL concentration is performed by multi-effect evaporators and is one of the most energy-intensive industrial separation processes.

Investigators

Sankar Nair
Associate Professor

Partner Organizations

Georgia Institute of Technology APPTI

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
3

Microwave Catalysis for Process Intensified Modular Production of Value-Added Chemicals from Natural Gas

The rise in US natural gas supplied, tied to challenges/costs associated with natural gas logistics point to the value of converting natural gas to liquid products. Indirect routes are generally energy inefficient and capital intensive. In contrast, direct non-oxidative natural gas conversion eliminates the syngas production step and required oxygen generation. However, these technologies have not been commercialized because of technical challenges such as low selectivity, coking, heat management, catalyst deactivation and catalyst regeneration.

Investigators

John Hu
Professor, Engineering

Focus Areas

Date approved

January 01, 2018
Current TRL
4

Energy Efficient Separations of Olefins and Paraffins through a membrane

Throughout the petrochemical and refining industry, the separation of olefins and paraffins is generally performed via distillation, a costly and capital intensive method, particularly for light olefins. This project uses a silver-incorporated custom amorphous fluoropolymer membrane to separate of olefins and paraffins. Compared to previous attempts using facilitated transport membranes, this membrane has been shown to have very good longevity in laboratory settings and has been tested with reasonably-expected process poisons.

Investigators

Hannah Murnen
Chief Technology Officer

Date approved

November 01, 2018
Current TRL
4

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