DIPPR is the world's best source of critically evaluated thermophysical and environmental property data.

Design Institute for Physical Properties (DIPPR)

The Design Institute for Physical Properties (DIPPR) has the mission to be the world’s best source of critically evaluated thermophysical, environmental, safety, and health property data. Data and estimation methods developed in DIPPR projects are used by leading chemical, petroleum, and pharmaceutical companies throughout the world to improve productivity, reduce cost, assure successful scale-up, and aid in environmental, health and safety compliance. 

Using Aspen Plus in Thermodynamics Instruction: A Step-by-Step Guide

February, 2015
Stanley I. Sandler offers a step-by-step guide for students and faculty on the use of Aspen in teaching thermodynamics. The book shows how easily-accessible, modern computational techniques are opening up new vistas in teaching thermodynamics, using a range of applications of Aspen Plus for the...

Accurately Predict the VLE of Thiol-Hydrocarbon Mixtures

Reactions and Separations
Vince Tassone, Chorng H. Twu, Wayne Sim
This methodology can be used to calculate vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) between thiols and hydrocarbons at any composition, temperature or pressure to improve gasoline fractionation processes.

Handbook of Polymer Solution Thermodynamics

December, 1993
Created for engineers and students working with pure polymers and polymer solutions, this handbook provides up-to-date, easy to use methods to obtain specific volumes and phase equilibrium data. A comprehensive database for the phase equilibria of a wide range of polymer-solvent systems, and PVT...

Handbook of Aqueous Electrolyte Thermodynamics: Theory & Application

June, 1986
Expertise in electrolyte systems has become increasingly important in traditional CPI operations, as well as in oil/gas exploration and production. This book is the source for predicting electrolyte systems behavior, an indispensable "do-it-yourself" guide, with a blueprint for formulating...
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