(281e) Nanofiltration: Integration in Medium Molecule Processes

Authors: 
Changi, S. M., University of Michigan
Klitzing, N., Eli Lilly and Company
Seibert, K., Eli Lilly and Company
Luciani, C., Eli Lilly and Company
Fisher, C., Eli Lilly and Company
Hamm, L., Eli Lilly and Company
Vaidyaraman, S., Eli Lilly and Company
Nanofiltration is a pressure and shear driven process for separating components of a process stream based on molecular size differences. Membrane separations using both ceramic and polymeric membranes have been around since the 1960s for industrial processes, with their use largely limited to aqueous systems. While membranes compatible with organic solvents have been used in manufacturing for many years, recently developed membrane materials allow their use to be extended to many other chemical processes and solvent systems, extending from small molecule development to peptide synthesis. Additionally, the semi-continuous nature of the nanofiltration system and ability to perform impurity removal at low temperatures makes nanofiltration well suited for incorporation into continuous processes. This talk will highlight the exploration of nanofiltration technology to help with: a) concentration, b) impurity purification, and c) solvent exchanges using different case study examples ranging from small molecules to medium size molecules (peptide) separation.