(154b) Characterization of Microreactors for Capture of Trace Carbonyl Compounds

Authors: 
Fu, X. A., University of Lousiville
Li, M., University of Louisville
Li, Q., University of Louisville
Ogunwale, M., Univeristy of Louisville
Nantz, M. H., University of Louisville

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly atmospheric pollutants from emissions of motor vehicles  and other combustion sources. Carbonyl compounds are produced by oxidation of virtually all hydrocarbons and photochemical reaction of precursors with free radicals and ozone.  Some carbonyl compounds including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein in cigarette smoke and e-cigarette vapor are main causes of lung cancer and cardiovascular disease. We developed a microeactor technique for capture and analysis of tract carbonyl compounds. The Microreactors were fabricated by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. There are thousands of micropillars in the channel of the microreactor. The micropillar surfaces are functionalized with a quaternary ammonium aminooxy salt for selectively capturing trace carbonyl compounds by means of oximation reactions.  The adducts are eluted by methanol and measured by a mass spectrometer. This paper presents design, and characterization of the microreactors and use of the microreactors for analysis of carbonyl compounds in smoke.