Molecular, Cellular, & Tissue Engineering

Cato Laurencin: Doing a World of Good

In this episode of the Foundation’s Doing a World of Good podcast, you'll meet Cato Laurencin who talks about his work in regenerative engineering. Listen on the Giving site or subscribe in iTunes.

May 2018 CEP Preview

May 18, 2018

This month, brush up on the essentials of continuous evaporation, learn new uses for hydrofoil impellers, enjoy the special section on translational medicine, and more.

Recent Advances in Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

May
2018
SBE Special Section
Samad Ahadian, Houman Savoji, Ali Khademhosseini
Hydrogels could play an important role in the fabrication of functional tissues for regenerative medicine. This article describes the developments in polymer chemistry, nanomaterials, molecular biology, and microscale technologies that are spurring advances in hydrogel fabrication.

SBE Special Section: Translational Medicine (Complete 44-Page Section)

May
2018
SBE Special Section
Engineering the Precise Translation of Novel Medicines; From Data to Diagnosis: The Search for Biochemical Markers of Autism Spectrum Disorder; Designing Drug Delivery Systems for Articular Joints; Curtailing Antiobiotic Use in Livestock Production; Recent Advances in Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering; Going Small is Big: Creating Organoids for Regenerative Medicine; Direct Production of Engineered Cardiac Tissue within Hybrid Biomaterials

Direct Production of Engineered Cardiac Tissue within Hybrid Biomaterials

May
2018
SBE Special Section
Morgan Ellis, Elizabeth Lipke
The human heart contains highly specialized cells that are especially vulnerable to damage because they lack regenerative capabilities. This article describes a novel method for encapsulating and directly differentiating induced pluripotent stem cells in hybrid biomaterials to form cardiac tissue.

Going Small Is Big: Creating Organoids for Regenerative Medicine

May
2018
SBE Special Section
Ogechi Ogoke, Mitchell H. Maloy, Saber Meamardoost, Natesh Parashurama
Organoids are a promising tool to replicate key structural and functional features of human organs. Recent developments in organoids to model the liver, biliary tract, and pancreas have the potential to advance regenerative medicine.

Building a Better Biofuel Production Platform

Conference Presentation
AIChE Annual Meeting
October 17, 2011
Building a Better Biofuel Production Platform: Engineering metabolic control techniques to control the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp...

From Biomass to Biofuels: Breaking the Cellulose Barrier

Archived Webinar
Oct 5, 2011
Cellulases are of considerable current interest for converting the cellulosic content of biomass to fermentable sugars for biofuels production. To facilitate the enzymatic conversion of biomass to...

Biomaterials for Stem Cell Tissue Engineering

Archived Webinar
Apr 5, 2011
Stem cells have become a promising cell source in the tissue engineering field. Intense studies have been focused at the cell and molecular biology levels on understanding the relationship between...

Towards Genome Engineering in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

Archived Webinar
Dec 14, 2010
Worth over $30 billion, therapeutic proteins, produced by recombinant mammalian cells, have been the fastest growing class of medicines in industrialized nations. Their importance in the health...

Gene Regulation by MAPK Substrate Competition

Conference Presentation
AIChE Annual Meeting
November 9, 2010
Introduction Traditional view of pattern formation in the early Drosophila embryo is essentially one-dimensional: The anterior, posterior, and...

Engineering Cancer-Fighting T Cells

October
2017
SBE Special Section
Eugenia Zah, Yvonne Y. Chen
Adoptive T-cell therapy is a personalized cancer treatment that has the potential to cure previously untreatable malignancies. Researchers are applying techniques in biomolecular engineering and synthetic biology to the development of next-generation therapeutic T cells with improved safety and efficacy against a variety of cancers.

There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom of a Cell

October
2017
SBE Special Section
Angela R. Wu, Lei Yu
Single-cell RNA sequencing is giving engineers and scientists the ability to better understand and manipulate the smallest unit of a living organism — the single cell. This technique has already ushered in breakthroughs in biology and medicine. However, challenges and opportunities abound.

SBE Special Section: Biomolecular Engineering (full 34-page section)

October
2017
SBE Special Section
SBE Update: The Many Applications of Biomolecular Engineering; A Materials Approach to Vaccines as Therapies; Engineering Cancer-Fighting T Cells; There's Plenty of Room at the Botton of a Cell; Computational Protein Engineering; Plant Metabolic Engineering for Chemicals, Fuels, and Precursors

Interview with Cato T. Laurencin about Regenerative Engineering

April 19, 2017

The RE Society Journal recently did an interview with Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D. to discuss the field of regenerative engineering. Dr. Laurencin is the founding director for the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences at University of Connecticut Health Center. He also serves as the chief executive officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science.

Polymer Nanotubes that Resemble Nerve Structures

August 26, 2015

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have created linkages of polymer nanotubes that resemble the structure of a nerve and are capable of transmitting electrical impulses.

Synthetic Membranes that Grow Like Living Cells

June 24, 2015

This week, a group of chemists and biologists working at the University of California San Diego announced that they have designed and synthesized an artificial cell membrane capable of sustaining c

Engineering Organs: Heart and Esophagus

December
2007
SBE Special Section
Buddy D. Ratner
The potential for tissue engineering to transform the practice of medicine is enormous. Chemical engineers will play important roles in this revolution.

Recombinant Protein Therapeutics from CHO Cells -- 20 Years and Counting

October
2007
SBE Special Section
Dr. Wei-Shou Hu, Karthik P. Jayapal, Katie F Wlaschin, Wei-Shou Hu and Miranda G. S. Yap
The CHO cell is at its height of technological prominence thanks to its adaptability to various culture conditions and plasticity in the context of genetic alterations. With further research, the application ofCell Culture Strategies based on...

Using Genomic Tools to Improve the Production of Biologics

November
2009
SBE Special Section
Dr. Wei-Shou Hu, Nitya M. Jacob, Wei-Shou Hu, Bernard Liat Wen Loo, and Miranda Yap
Recombinant DNA technology transforms mammalian cells into factories for protein-based therapeutics. New techniques provide chemical engineers with a better understanding of the process as well as the cells themselves.

Singapore: An Emerging Leader in Biomedical Sciences

October
2007
SBE Special Section
Niki S. C. Wong, Miranda G. S. Yap
With a heavy investment in biomedical research— particularly the $330 million to build Biopolis in 2003— Singapore is seeing the fruits of its labor blossom.

Your Personal Genome for $1,000?

November
2009
SBE Special Section
IBM scientists from four fields — nanofabrication, microelectronics, physics and biology — are collaborating to develop a “DNA transistor” that could make obtaining a personalized genome analysis easier, faster, and cheaper — ultimately as low as $...

Consider Using Fluoropolymers in Biological Applications

December
2004
Materials
Lauri Jenkins, Sharon Libert, Victor Lusvardi
Even with the use of costly corrosion-resistant alloys, metal contamination continues to occur in the biologics industry, thus reducing product yield and activity. Fluoropolymers are emerging as a viable solution to this problem.

Industry and SBE News

October
2007
SBE Special Section
Dr. George Georgiou to Receive SBE's James E. Bailey Award; Averting an Epidemic— Novel Device Detects Avian Flu Virus in Less than Half an Hour; Cell-Free Protein Sythesis Comes of Age; Genetically Engineering Microorganisms into Pharmaceutical...

Deciphering the Mechanisms of Therapeutic Protein Production

October
2007
SBE Special Section
Daniel W. Allison, Christoph L. Bausch, Trissa Borgschulte, Matthew V. Caple, Kevin J. Kayser
Demand for therapeutic recombinant proteins will eventually exceed current production capabilities. This is a major driver in further understanding Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell biology, which is the cell line of choice for producing these...

Bioprinting: Directed Tissue Self-Assembly

December
2007
SBE Special Section
Vladimir Kasyanov, Roger Markwald, Vladimir Mironov
Imagine eliminating patient waiting lists for organ transplants. Bioprinting holds the promise of making this happen, but, must research must be done first.
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