(700d) Graphene-Silk Fibroin and Noble Metal Nanocomposites for Biosensing Applications

Authors: 
Nagelli, E. A., United States Military Academy
Sheehan, P. L., Army Futures Command, RDECOM-ARDEC
Moore, H. L., Army Futures Command, RDECOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal
Mitropoulos, A., United States Military Academy
Sims, R. K., United States Military Academy
Haney, P., Army Futures Command, RDECOM-ARDEC
Burpo, F. J., United States Military Academy
Wang, J., United States Military Academy
Brinson, K., United States Military Academy
Alvermann, T., United States Military Academy
Woronowicz, K., United States Military Academy
Graphene-Silk Fibroin and Noble Metal Nanocomposites for Biosensing Applications

R. Kenneth Sims, Jenny Wang, Kenneth C. Brinson, Thomas A. Alvermann, Alexander N. Mitropoulos, Kamil Woronowicz, Pamela L. Sheehan, Preston C. Haney, Harry L. Moore, F. John Burpo, Enoch A. Nagelli*

Department of Chemistry & Life Science, Chemical Engineering Program

Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering

United States Military Academy, West Point, NY 10996

1Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Demilitarization & Experimental Directorate, Army Futures

Command, RDECOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ


*Corresponding PI: Dr. Enoch Nagelli, Email: enoch.nagelli@westpoint.edu

The superior properties of graphene make it the ideal platform nanomaterial for metal nanoparticle deposition within biopolymer nanocomposites for biosensor applications. The integration of graphene and noble metal nanoparticles with biopolymers enhances the overall electrical, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties to develop the next generation of nanoscale biosensors. Current methods to develop conductive biomaterials involve the need for external stimuli sources and the use of harsh reducing agents.1-5 A more simple and scalable method is the electroless deposition of noble metal nanoparticles through a spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction to produce graphene-biopolymer-noble metal nanoparticle hybrid nanocomposites. The galvanic displacement process involves the formation of noble metal nanoparticles onto the silk fibroin structure through electron transfer from the differences in the reduction potential involving noble metal ions and the supporting metal substrate.6-7 This novel and spontaneous process involves noble metal nanoparticle deposition through the immersion of copper supported silk-fibroin thin films into an aqueous solution of graphene oxide and noble metal salts (HAuCl4,K2PtCl4, and Na2PdCl4) through the galvanic displacement of copper for the electroless deposition of noble metal nanoparticles onto silk fibroin thin films. The thermodynamic reduction potential of the underlying supporting substrate is the determining factor in governing which noble metal ions can be reduced to nanoparticles. Therefore, this approach is a platform to produce conductive silk fibroin films in a scalable, cost-efficient, rapid, and tunable process for novel biosensor applications.

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