(447g) Synthetic Photoelectrochemical Complexes for Solar Energy Conversion That Self-Regenerate

Authors: 
Strano, M. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Boghossian, A. A. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ham, M. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jeng, E. S. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Graff, R. A. - Presenter, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Heller, D. A. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chang, A. C. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Mattis, A. - Presenter, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Bayburt, T. H. - Presenter, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Grinkova, Y. V. - Presenter, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Zeiger, A. S. - Presenter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Hobbie, E. K. - Presenter, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Sligar, S. G. - Presenter, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Wraight, C. A. - Presenter, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


Naturally occurring photosynthetic systems in plants are supported by elaborate pathways of self-repair that limit the impact of photo-damage and degradation. Despite advantages in stability and fault tolerance, synthetic photoelectrochemical systems have to date been invariably static. Herein, we demonstrate a complex consisting of two recombinant proteins, phospholipid and a carbon nanotube that reversibly assembles into a particular configuration, forming an array of 4 nm lipid bilayers housing light-converting proteins orientated perpendicular such that the hole conducting site is in close proximity to the nanotube conductor. The complex can reversibly self-assemble into this useful configuration, and disassemble to free components upon the addition of sodium cholate, over an indefinite number of cycles. The assembly is thermodynamically meta-stable and can only transition reversibly between free components and assembled state if the rate of surfactant removal exceeds about 10-5 sec-1. In the assembled state only, the complexes exhibit high photoelectrochemical activity using a dual Fe(CN)63-/ubiquinone mediator with external efficiencies near 40% that are repeatedly recoverable even after continuous cycles of disassembly and regeneration. By mimicking natural repair processes, such systems may lead to more robust and facile solar conversion systems.