John Rogers | AIChE

John Rogers

Professor John A. Rogers obtained BA and BS degrees in chemistry and physics from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1989.  From MIT, he received SM degrees in physics and chemistry in 1992 and the Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry in 1995.  From 1995 to 1997, Rogers was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard University Society of Fellows.  During this time he also served as a founder and Director of Active Impulse Systems, a company that commercialized technologies developed during his Ph.D. work.  He joined Bell Laboratories as a Member of Technical Staff in the Condensed Matter Physics Research Department in 1997 and served as Director of this department from the end of 2000 to the end of 2002.

From 2003-2016, he was on the faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, where he held a Swanlund Chair, the highest chaired position at the university, with a primary appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and joint appointments in the Departments of Chemistry, Bioengineering, Mechanical Science and Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering.  He served as the Director of a Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on nanomanufacturing, funded by the National Science Foundation, from 2009-2012 and as Director of the Seitz Materials Research Laboratory from 2012 to 2016.

In September of 2016, he joined Northwestern University as the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science, Chemistry and Neurological Surgery, where he is also the founding Director of the newly endowed Center on Bio-Integrated Electronics.

Rogers’ research includes fundamental and applied aspects of nano and molecular scale fabrication as well as materials and patterning techniques for unusual electronic and photonic devices, with an emphasis on bio-integrated and bio-inspired systems.  He has published more than 650 papers and is an inventor on over 100 patents and patent applications, more than 70 of which are licensed or in active use by large companies and startups that he has co-founded.

His research has been recognized with many awards including, most recently, the Benjamin Franklin Medal from the Franklin Institute (2019), the MRS Medal from the Materials Research Society (2018), the Samuel R. Natelson Award from the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (2018), the Nadai Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2017), the IEEE EMBS Trailblazer Award (2016), the ETH Zurich Chemical Engineering Medal (2015), the A.C. Eringen Medal from the Society for Engineering Science (2014), the Smithsonian Award for American Ingenuity in the Physical Sciences (2013), the Robert Henry Thurston Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2013), the Mid-Career Researcher Award from the Materials Research Society (2013), the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2011), a MacArthur Fellowship from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (2009), the George Smith Award from the IEEE (2009), the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship from the Department of Defense (2008), the Daniel Drucker Eminent Faculty Award from the University of Illinois (2007) and the Leo Hendrick Baekeland Award from the American Chemical Society (2007).  Rogers is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE; 2011), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS; 2015) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS; 2014), a Fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE; 2009), the American Physical Society (APS; 2006), the Materials Research Society (MRS; 2007), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; 2008) and the National Academy of Inventors (NAI; 2013). He received an Honoris Causa Doctorate from the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and holds Honorary Professorships at Fudan University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Zhejiang University.