Management and Supervisory

Leading a Diverse Team

. by Loraine Kasprzak

Team members with different backgrounds can provide new perspectives and ideas that help fuel innovation and create more engaged employees.

Managing Change

. by Teresa Jurgens-Kowal

Change brings a dichotomy of emotions: we are either excited for, or absolutely dread, change. Learn to handle change better and manage positive change as a leader within your organization.

December 2016 CEP Preview

. by Douglas B. Clark

This month, CEP features a look at business planning, as well as pump sizing, reducing process safety risks with the bow-tie diagram, and much more.

Book Review: Open Innovation

. by Teresa Jurgens-Kowal

Open innovation may be the latest buzzword, but it's value to chemical engineers goes well beyond a shiny new expression to toss about. Check out this review of one of the latest books dedicated to the subject.

Lessons on Leading Change

. by Teresa Jurgens-Kowal

What type of leader are you, and what are your strongest abilities? Learning to lead means understanding where your strengths as a leader lie so you can also learn to manage your weaknesses.

Your First Year as a Manager

. by Martin Bergstedt

If you are considering or have been offered a management position, how are things going to change for you? What is that first year going to be like? Dr. Jonathan Worstell outlined some answers to these questions and a framework for the transition of the new manager.

Becoming a Leader

. by Loraine Kasprzak

Loraine Kasprzak, CMC, of CEP magazine talks to senior executive coach Mike Martorella to learn how engineers can become successful leaders.

Transitioning to Management

. by Loraine Kasprzak

Loraine Kasprzak, CMC, of CEP magazine interviews senior executive coach Mike Martorella for advice on making the transition from engineer to manager.

YPC Presents an "MBA the ChemE Way" Workshop

. by Elizabeth Guenther

If you are like most engineers, you didn’t have much time for electives in college – and when you did, economics may not have been your cup of tea. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if AIChE had some business-related programming at the Annual Meeting for Young Professionals to learn more and add to their skill sets? Your wait is over!

How ChE Prepared Me for Business (and How It Didn’t): Final Thoughts

. by Arkan Kayihan

The ChE discipline would benefit by putting just as much focus on developing the next generation of Jack Welchs as well as Linus Paulings. What is the business case for doing so? This series has shed light on how these other skills directly affect our careers and ability to get work accomplished and even the potential impact on the financial viability of our engineering departments.

How ChE Prepared Me for Business (and How It Didn’t): Sales

. by Arkan Kayihan

We are always selling. Vendors sell goods, consultants sell advice, politicians sell themselves, demonstrators who occupy Wall Street sell their cause, entrepreneurs sell new concepts, artists sell designs, and even parents sell their standards. Regardless of the way you describe it, teaching, pitching, proposing, convincing – sales is about getting another person to do something and we all need to know how to do sales well to get things done.

You Got Your PhD, Now What? - Video Blog of the Annual Meeting's Best Non-Technical Session

. by Andrew McUsic

Having a PhD does not mean you have to spend your whole career working in research. Experienced attendees discussed how they overcame the stereotype that PhDs are research workers and moved into leadership roles in industry. A Q&A session addressed career planning issues that new PhDs should consider when starting out in industry.

I captured some highlights of this session in the following videos:

How ChE Prepared Me for Business (and How It Didn’t): Finance

. by Arkan Kayihan

Most engineers I knew in my MBA program went into finance. It’s not too surprising: you need to be analytical and highly skilled in Excel. Our academic cousins in Physics were applying differential equations at Long Term Capital Management (the case study for “math gone wrong”) and prior to the housing crisis Wall Street was even hiring engineers without their MBAs (article). But there is a difference between finance for the Street and the finance used to drive operations. We’ll focus on the latter and how it ties into our fundamental building block for ChE: The Material & Energy Balance.

How ChE Prepared Me for Business (and How It Didn’t): Intro

. by Arkan Kayihan

An experience all chemical engineers (ChE) share is the variety of reactions they get at parties: “You’re a chemist? You destroy the environment? You have a life outside of crunching numbers? Or perhaps the reaction is the inevitable eye-glazing and quick transition to the weather. Occasionally, one meets a person who knows a ChE and their reaction is something more along the lines of, “So, you’re a smarty pants.”

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