Photo: courtesy of energy.wvu.edu

Natural Gas Utilization Workshop

Overcoming Hurdles of Technology Implementation
November 1-3, 2016

This workshop brought together leaders in downstream natural gas conversion across industry, academia and government to discuss various perspectives on hurdles to technology implementation.

 Final Program Book

View the workshop presentations embedded in the program here:

Program with Presentations

AIChE’s Center for Energy Initiatives (CEI), with the support of WVU Shale Gas Center, WVU Statler College, and Siluria Technologies, hosted a consensus-building workshop on Nov. 1-3, 2016 in Morgantown, WV to bring together leaders in downstream natural gas conversion across industry, academia and government to discuss various perspectives on hurdles to technology implementation.

Objectives:

  • Examine features of the downstream industry that have successfully adopted some new, beneficial technologies
  • Understand how these features affect the development and commercialization of natural gas technologies
  • Provide recommendations to federal agencies to accelerate the rate of technology adoption based on the diverse stakeholder interests along and across the natural gas value chain

Session Topics:

  • Solving Challenges from the Policy and Market Perspectives
  • Decision Calculi at Different Nodes of the NG Value Chain
  • Technology Commercialization: Developing and De-Risking

Participating Organizations:

  • Amec Foster Wheeler
  • Anderson Energy
  • Argonne National Laboratory
  • Chemical Alliance Zone
  • Covestro, LLC
  • DOE
  • The Dow Chemical Company
  • ExxonMobil
  • Gas Technology Institute
  • Idaho National Laboratory
  • MATRIC
  • NETL
  • The Ohio State University
  • Pennsylvania State University
  • Reaction 35, LLC
  • Siluria Technologies
  • Texas A&M University
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • West Virginia University

The American natural gas industry has undergone a complete transformation in the past decade. Many diverse factors contributed to this well-documented transformation, but technological innovations in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing are widely credited with enabling this change. Certain features of the upstream in the natural gas value chain enabled the rapid uptake of these technologies, and provided the conditions required for fast learning cycle times among exploration and production (E&P) companies. Similarly, features of the midstream industry enabled modularization and standardization of cryogenic gas processing equipment to set the standard, giving rise to a massive growth in the capacity and required shift in location of gas processing capacity.

With notable exceptions, conversion technologies have been largely deployed in downstream markets like refining and petrochemicals. This workshop, the first in a series of workshops on natural gas conversion technologies, examines the features of the downstream industry that have at times adopted new and beneficial technologies, and seeks to understand how these features may act as constraints to the development and commercialization of technology in this new era of natural gas. Further, this workshop will consider the diverse stakeholder interests along and across the natural gas value chain and looks to provide recommendations to federal agencies to accelerate the rate of technology adoption.