Energy and Entropy, Concepts and Balances

Originally delivered May 20, 2015
Source: AIChE
  • Type:
    Archived Webinar
  • Level:
    Intermediate
  • Duration:
    1 hour
  • PDHs:
    1.00

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Energy and entropy balances are central to process thermodynamics calculations. This presentation reviews the principles for each balance. Examples are provided for valves, compressors, turbines, heat exchangers and their combinations. Concepts are provided to permit extension to generic processes. Principles of reference states are included, and commonly used reference states and property calculation pathways are reviewed.

Good skills with energy balances are important for process design and troubleshooting. Entropy is a defined property important for understanding optimum work interactions (least work input or most work output) for a process. The energy balance and entropy balance are also known as the first law and second law of thermodynamics, respectively.

Presenter(s): 

Carl Lira

Carl T. Lira is co-author of the widely-used textbook Introductory Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at Michigan State University. He teaches thermodynamics at all levels, chemical kinetics, and material and energy balances. His research accomplishments include experimental measurements and modeling for liquid metals, supercritical fluids, adsorptive separations, and liquid-vapor, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid phase equilibria. Currently, Professor Lira specializes in the study of...Read more

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Webinar content is available with the kind permission of the author(s) solely for the purpose of furthering AIChE’s mission to educate, inform and improve the practice of professional chemical engineering. All other uses are forbidden without the express consent of the author(s).
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