Microbial and Human Multiplex Genome Engineering & Selection

Microbial and Human Multiplex Genome Engineering & Selection
Sunday, January 13, 2013, 5:45pm-6:45pm EST

 

George Church


Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Director of Synthetic Biology, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Boston, MA
Director of NIH-Center of Excellence in Genomic Science and DOE-GTL Genomics Centers

Genome Engineering requires: 1) bio computer aided design tools; 2) raw DNA synthesis at high efficiency ( 100kb/$) and accuracy (99.98%).  3) multiplex insertion of such DNA into genomes at 5 or more per cell at once and billions of genomes per day;  4) "Sensor-selector" circuits which can keep up with the design and genome generation tools.  Libraries of 10,000 or more genetic constructs can be made inexpensively using oligonucleotide chips. Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) enabled the first Genomically Recoded Organism designed and shown to have new desired functionality (dedicated codon for novel amino acids, genetic isolation and virus resistance).  A highly modified CRISPR Cas9 plus guide-RNA system  greatly accelerates progress toward human MAGE. 
 

George Church

George Church is Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Director of NIH-CEGS and DOE-GTL Genomics Centers. He has pioneered technology innovations early in the development of key fields in chemistry and biomedicine.
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