Legislative & Regulatory Update

A dinosaur's evolution of the claw

How did the evolution of the dinosaur claw evolve into the current bird form? A new University of Bristol study into the claws of a group of theropod dinosaurs, known as therizinosaurs, has revealed a great versatility in their usage. Theropod dinosaurs, a group that includes such famous species as Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor, are often regarded as carnivorous and predatory animals, using their sharp teeth and claws to capture and dispatch prey. However, the detailed look at forelimb claws demonstrates that these claws were very likely to have been used for other tasks.

In search of safe drinking water

Regulatory news - ENN - May 7, 2014 - 10:55am
Access to safe drinking water is a fundamental requirement for good health and is also a human right. WHO and UNICEF’s indicator is based upon the "use of an improved source". The authors of a recent study into water contamination postulated that this did not account for water quality measurements or monitor global access to safe drinking water. Researchers Robert Bain and Jamie Bartram from The Water Institute at University of North Carolina sought to determine whether water from "improved" sources is less likely to contain fecal contamination than "unimproved" sources and to assess the extent to which contamination varies by source type and setting.

Scotland urging citizens to leave the car in the garage!

Climate Change News - ENN - May 6, 2014 - 5:53pm
Scots are being encouraged to leave the car for journeys under two miles and enjoy the stress-relieving and health benefits of active travel, such as walking or cycling. Minister for Environment and Climate Change Paul Wheelhouse has launched the second phase of the national Active Travel campaign, confirming a further £250,000 for local authorities to promote the initiative.

Releasing the cork in Wilkes Basin Antarctica yields unstoppable sea-level rise

Climate Change News - ENN - May 6, 2014 - 5:51pm
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) latest study shows that if East Antarctica's Wilkes Basin's rim of ice lets go, it is likely to trigger a persistent ice discharge into the ocean, resulting in unstoppable sea-level rise for thousands of years to come. Using the ground profile under the ice, the researchers used computer ice flow simulations under the ice sheet.

Releasing the cork in Wilkes Basin Antarctica yields unstoppable sea-level rise

Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) latest study shows that if East Antarctica's Wilkes Basin's rim of ice lets go, it is likely to trigger a persistent ice discharge into the ocean, resulting in unstoppable sea-level rise for thousands of years to come. Using the ground profile under the ice, the researchers used computer ice flow simulations under the ice sheet.

Releasing the cork in Wilkes Basin Antarctica yields unstoppable sea-level rise

Regulatory news - ENN - May 6, 2014 - 5:51pm
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) latest study shows that if East Antarctica's Wilkes Basin's rim of ice lets go, it is likely to trigger a persistent ice discharge into the ocean, resulting in unstoppable sea-level rise for thousands of years to come. Using the ground profile under the ice, the researchers used computer ice flow simulations under the ice sheet.

Which Diamondback terrapin turtle is not like the others?

Until now little has been understood about the genetic variations of terrapin turtles. Terrapins have been designated a species of special concern in some areas and not in others. They are listed as an endangered species in Rhode Island and threatened in Massachusetts. Terrapins are the only North American turtle that spends its entire life in coastal marshes and mangroves.

Spray Foam Coalition Comments on California ‘Priority Products List’ Workshop

Chemical Safety - May 6, 2014 - 12:55pm
The California Department of Toxic Substances Control’s (DTSC) Safer Consumer Products Program is holding a public workshop May 7 in Sacramento to gather input on the initial Priority Products list before the official rulemaking process begins. The Spray Foam Coalition, a self-funded group of the American Chemistry Council (ACC), released the following statement in advance of the workshop:

Spray Foam Coalition Comments on California ‘Priority Products List’ Workshop

Environmental Regulations - May 6, 2014 - 12:55pm
The California Department of Toxic Substances Control’s (DTSC) Safer Consumer Products Program is holding a public workshop May 7 in Sacramento to gather input on the initial Priority Products list before the official rulemaking process begins. The Spray Foam Coalition, a self-funded group of the American Chemistry Council (ACC), released the following statement in advance of the workshop:

New Report Notes Progress, Recommends Additional Improvements to Strengthen EPA's Chemical Assessment Program

Chemical Safety - May 6, 2014 - 12:15pm
We welcome this important report and are particularly encouraged that the NAS has recognized the need for EPA to address fundamental issues with the IRIS program.

U.S. Federal Government Amps Up E-Waste Reuse and Recycling

Regulatory news - ENN - May 6, 2014 - 8:59am
The U.S. federal government is the nation's largest consumer and disposer of electronics. Considering the number of federal employees—about 2.7 million at last count, not including the military or courts—U.S. government employees contribute a massive portion to the approximate 2.4 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, that is discarded annually. Not only are those monitors, printers, cell phones and all those peripherals leeching chemicals into soil and water supplies, government (as well as companies) leave money on the table thanks to all of those rare earth minerals allowing them to function in the first place.

U.S. Federal Government Amps Up E-Waste Reuse and Recycling

The U.S. federal government is the nation's largest consumer and disposer of electronics. Considering the number of federal employees—about 2.7 million at last count, not including the military or courts—U.S. government employees contribute a massive portion to the approximate 2.4 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, that is discarded annually. Not only are those monitors, printers, cell phones and all those peripherals leeching chemicals into soil and water supplies, government (as well as companies) leave money on the table thanks to all of those rare earth minerals allowing them to function in the first place.

2015 Volkswagen Jetta Diesel Jumps to 45 MPG on Highway

Volkswagen unveiled the latest updates to its popular VW Jetta line at this year’s New York International Auto Show. The car will get a few minor styling tweaks, but what interests us are the improvements under the hood—where fuel efficiency counts.

With spring migration in full flight, a new report urges greater protection for an avian haven

Climate Change News - ENN - May 5, 2014 - 11:18am
It's been dubbed North America's bird nursery: the sprawling billion-plus-acre boreal forest that spans the continent from Alaska across Canada to Newfoundland and Labrador. Each spring, an estimated 1 billion to 3 billion nesting birds make the long journey north to the boreal forest from wintering grounds throughout the United States and central and South America. Their populations swell during the boreal breeding season, and as many as 3 billion to 5 billion birds of remarkable diversity—from ring-necked ducks to whooping cranes to Cape May warblers to golden eagles—can make the return trip south in the fall.

With spring migration in full flight, a new report urges greater protection for an avian haven

Regulatory news - ENN - May 5, 2014 - 11:18am
It's been dubbed North America's bird nursery: the sprawling billion-plus-acre boreal forest that spans the continent from Alaska across Canada to Newfoundland and Labrador. Each spring, an estimated 1 billion to 3 billion nesting birds make the long journey north to the boreal forest from wintering grounds throughout the United States and central and South America. Their populations swell during the boreal breeding season, and as many as 3 billion to 5 billion birds of remarkable diversity—from ring-necked ducks to whooping cranes to Cape May warblers to golden eagles—can make the return trip south in the fall.

New hopes for getting the lead out of solar

Solar energy is arguably our most viable low cost energy source. It is forever sustainable and easily captured and converted. But now the technology may have taken yet another leap forward. To date the foundational technology behind photovoltaics was a structure called perovskite, which has been made with lead. Using tin instead of lead perovskite as the harvester of light, a team of Northwestern University researchers has created a new solar cell with "good efficiency". This good efficiency solar cell is low-cost, environmentally friendly and can be easily made using "bench" chemistry -- no fancy equipment or hazardous materials.

New hopes for getting the lead out of solar

Regulatory news - ENN - May 5, 2014 - 11:16am
Solar energy is arguably our most viable low cost energy source. It is forever sustainable and easily captured and converted. But now the technology may have taken yet another leap forward. To date the foundational technology behind photovoltaics was a structure called perovskite, which has been made with lead. Using tin instead of lead perovskite as the harvester of light, a team of Northwestern University researchers has created a new solar cell with "good efficiency". This good efficiency solar cell is low-cost, environmentally friendly and can be easily made using "bench" chemistry -- no fancy equipment or hazardous materials.

Spanish Island Powered by 100 Percent Renewable Energy

Climate Change News - ENN - May 5, 2014 - 9:06am
The possibilities of renewable energy are on display as El Hierro, the smallest of Spain’s Canary Islands, is set to become the world’s first land mass to be fully energy self-sufficient, when an 11.5 megawatt wind farm goes online late next month.

Spanish Island Powered by 100 Percent Renewable Energy

The possibilities of renewable energy are on display as El Hierro, the smallest of Spain’s Canary Islands, is set to become the world’s first land mass to be fully energy self-sufficient, when an 11.5 megawatt wind farm goes online late next month.

ACC Announces 2014 Responsible Care® Energy Efficiency Award Winners

Energy - May 5, 2014 - 6:19am
At the 2014 Responsible Care Conference and Expo this week, the American Chemistry Council (ACC) honored 16 of its member companies for implementing energy-efficiency improvements in 2013. ACC presented a total of 50 awards to these companies, 12 of which were deemed programs of “Exceptional Merit.”

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