Tapping into the Chemistry of Beer and Brewing

Originally delivered Apr 6, 2011
Developed by: AIChE
  • Type:
    Archived Webinar
  • Level:
    Intermediate
  • PDHs:
    1.00

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This webinar puts the complexity of malting and brewing into readily accessible terms. Anyone interested in understanding the journey from grain, hops and yeast through to the world’s favorite alcoholic beverage will gain a new appreciation for the skill that goes into making a product with such consistent excellence. The science underpinning the quality attributes of beer - from foam to flavor, haze to wholesomeness, is described. The major styles of beer are introduced. Anyone, beer lover or not, who is curious about quite why beer is the ultimate biotechnology will benefit by experiencing this webinar.

Save while you learn. This webinar is part of the specially discounted ‘Holiday Webinar Bundle’ offering three webinars for one low price. Click here for more information.

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Presenter(s): 

Dr. Charlie Bamforth

Dr. Charlie Bamforth is Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor of Malting & Brewing Sciences at UCD. He has been part of the brewing industry for over thirty two years. He is formerly Deputy Director-General of Brewing Research International and Research Manager and Quality Assurance Manager of Bass Brewers. He is a Special Professor in the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham, England and was previously Visiting Professor of Brewing at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland.

Charlie is a Fellow of the Institute of Brewing & Distilling, Fellow of the Society of...Read more

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Pricing

AIChE Member Credits 1
AIChE Members $69.00
AIChE Undergraduate Student Members Free
AIChE Graduate Student Members Free
Non-Members $99.00
Webinar content is available with the kind permission of the author(s) solely for the purpose of furthering AIChE’s mission to educate, inform and improve the practice of professional chemical engineering. All other uses are forbidden without the express consent of the author(s). For permission to re-use, please contact chemepermissions@aiche.org.